About Being a Skeptical

Guys, do you ever know Giant and Last Boy? A book that explores a six-packs-potential? That book is funny, but it is also very true.

How many times do we get bent out of shape, and spend precious moments of our time (and every moment is precious), trying to convince someone just because they are wrong?

Think about it: there are over six and a half billion people on this planet. That is a lot, once again, a looot! But that number pales to insignificance when you consider the amount of knowledge available in the universe. Every detail of every action of all time. Every fact of every attribute of every event, and every object that ever occurred or existed. Every thought of every human in response to every stimulus in history!

That still blows me away.

When you consider the vastness of total knowledge, the amount you think you know becomes a tiny spot, indistinguishable in a lake of ink that spreads as far as the horizon way.

And then when you look at what you know, with an honest mind, how much do you really know? How many times have you held something with absolute conviction, yet only to rethink it as complete foolishness a few short years later? Hopefully many, many, many times. There is very little we can be sure of what we did. I won’t say, like many, that there is nothing that we can be sure of, which is foolishness. But the real majority of our knowledge is on very low ground.

So when you couple these two considerations together, you must realize the self-evident fact that the huge, vast majority of people in the world are just simply wrong about almost everything, including yourself (also myself).

This is a humbling, and a daunting prospect. Only God is absolutely right, with absolute knowledge. And it is insufferable arrogance to assume that we are anywhere close to Him in that regard – but in my point of view, no one is wrong about everything, each person has a certain measure of absolute truth in their keeping!

So what do we do when we find out that someone is wrong?

Well most of the time we can simply pass on. We have other things to do. At least, hopefully we do. There are only a very few, very rare situations in which it is appropriate and helpful to address someone’s perceived error – LOL.

And even then, first make sure that you are really in disagreement. The vast, vast majority of perceived disagreements are just that, perceived. It is extremely easy to mistake someone’s point of view. And it is even easier to assume that they believe things that they really don’t. You might be in agreement on everything they say except for one small point.

Then, don’t attack. Being mistaken is never a sin itself even in matters of doctrine, and it is rarely very bad either. It can be dangerous, though, which should motivate us to be as kind and unselfish as possible in helping the other person.

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